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#5 in multiple New York Times bestseller Larry Correia’s Monster Hunter series.

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Book #6 in the popular Carrera military science fiction series.

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Book #4 of the Jason Thanou Time Travel series. Sequel to Pirates of the Timestream.

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Beauty Meets Beast in San Francisco

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Contains Books #5 and #6 The Sword and The Chosen, in the best selling General series.

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Zombies are real. And we made them. Are you prepared for the zombie apocalypse? The Smith family is, with the help of a few marines.

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Book One of the Cobra Rebellion Saga, and a new entry in New York Times #1 best seller Timothy Zahn's legendary Cobra series.

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The mantis cyborgs: insectlike, cruel, and determined to wipe humanity from the face of the galaxy.

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Sequel to The Heretic, Book 10 in the nationally best‑selling General series.

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Sequel to A View from the Imperium. Jeeves in space! Rollicking adventure featuring a seemingly dense, lovable nobleman and his indespensible, droll aide, Parsons.

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July Contest

Meet Agent Franks of the U.S. Monster Control Bureau, one monster you most definitely want on your side. When Franks is injured (or simply when it’s time for an upgrade), he swaps out the old body part for the new. Consider current celebrities and/or historic figures. Now tell us three who would make Franks even more bad***, er effective, than he already is? Send us your list and why and win a free signed hardcover of Monster Hunter Nemesis.

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Check out the Baen Teacher's Guide to Treecat Wars, the latest in our popular series of teacher’s guides for Baen books that might be appropriate for high school or college classroom reading. These includes synopses, discussion questions, quizzes, and more. Our latest reader’s group guide is 1636: The Devil’s Opera Reader's Group Guide, useful for your book club, online reading group, and to enhance your own enjoyment of the book.

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The Indi Group isn’t known for its humanitarian principles. They’re all about the bottom line, even if that means taking steps that most would find appalling. But the higher-ups are about to find out that when you put human lives on a balance sheet, you may not get the results you’re after. And that the intangible things in life—loyalty, compassion, and beauty—sometimes conquer even the most cold-hearted financial equations. An all-new story, set in the Trial By Fire universe, from Charles E. Gannon.


A Thing of Beauty

by Charles E. Gannon

“The children have become an unacceptably dangerous liability. Don’t you agree, Director Simovic?”

“Perhaps, Ms. Hoon. But how would you propose to resolve the problem?”

“Director, it is generally company policy to…liquidate assets whose valuations are subpar and declining.”

Elnessa Clare managed not to fumble the wet, sloppy clay she was adding to the frieze, despite being triply stunned by the calm exchange between her corporate patrons. The first of the three shocks was her immediate reaction to the topic: liquidate the children? My children? Well, they’re not mine—not anymore—but, just last year, they would have been mine, when I was still the transitional foster parent for company orphans. How could anyone—even these bloodless suits—talk about “liquidating the children?”

The second shock was that these two bloodless suits were discussing this while Elnessa was in the room and only twenty feet away, at that. But then again, why be surprised? Their company, the Indi Group, was simply an extension of the megacorporate giant, CoDevCo and evinced all its parent’s tendencies toward callousness and exploitation. It also possessed the same canny ability to generate profits, often by ruthlessly factoring human losses into their spreadsheets just like any other actuarial number

The third shock was that Elnessa could hear Simovic and Hoon at all, let alone make out the words. Because of the xenovirus which had hit her shortly after arriving on Kitts—officially, Epsilon Indi 2 K—Elnessa had suffered losses in mobility and sensory acuity. But every once in a while, she experienced an equally troublesome inversion of these handicaps: unprecedented (albeit transient) sensory amplification. Six months ago, she had had to endure a hyperactive set of tastebuds. All but the blandest of foods had made her retch. And now, over the past four days, her steady hearing loss had abruptly reversed, particularly in the higher ranges. Elnessa had acquired a new-found empathy for dogs), and could now pick out conversations from uncommonly far-off, whereas only a week ago, she had been trying to learn lip-reading.


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The second and final installment of neuroscience researcher and science educator Tedd Roberts’ essay explaining what science is and isn’t, why the personality cult of the Scientist is often misguided, and “Why Science is Never Settled.”



Why Science is Never Settled – Part Two

by Tedd Roberts

Scientists are human, too

Yes, scientists are human, with all of the faults and foibles that implies. The example of the "Bone Wars" between paleontologists Cope and Marsh should tell us that. While popular culture prefers to paint Galileo as persecuted by the Church for his science -- indeed, consequently founding a counter-religious illuminati of scientists -- careful study of history reveals that Galileo was not "persecuted" for his beliefs, but rather he was sanctioned by Rome for his personal actions in defiance of a church order of which he was a member. We certainly have plenty of parallels today in which it is easy to point to scientists whose behavior casts a shadow on their own work. Of course, there are a few factors which tend to assist the process of self-destruction.

The problem of "Publish-or-Perish"

The essential currency of an academic scientist consists of two items: how many papers they publish, and how well-funded their research. While many scientists would love to have a job where all they needed to do was conduct experiments with no obligation to fight for promotion and funding, the simple truth is that any job must be evaluated by some form of a performance metric. Within most scientific jobs, that metric consists of having other scientists evaluate your work and pronounce that it is good. Typically, this consists of writing up results (and conclusions), submitting them to a scientific journal, obtaining a favorable review by peers, and then having that paper published in a journal where others can read it. Most of the evaluation of "worth" comes from the peer-review process (and more on that later), since, once published, any confirmation or refutation of the experimental results must take the form of letters to the editor, or new papers which agree or disagree with the published results. Letters to the editor are in fact very rare in science -- not that they are there, but that the number of letters compared to the number of published papers is really very small (not all journals accept letters, and even then, there may be 1-2 per issue, while the number of new papers is often 20-50 per issue).


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