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The Mesan Alignment: a centuries‑old cabal that seeks to impose its vision of a society dominated by genetic rank onto the human race. Now the conspiracy stands exposed by spies Anton Zilwicki and Victor Cachat—one an agent of Honor Harrington’s Star Kingdom of Manticore, the other a Havenite operative. The outing of the Alignment has turned the galaxy’s political framework topsy‑turvy. Old coalitions have disintegrated. New alliances have been born.

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The balance point of interplanetary Cold War II between Earth and monolithic Yavet tips unexpectedly toward peace. Covert ops Captain Jazen Parker and his sharp shooting lover and partner Kit Born slide from world saving hazardous duty to escorting a telepathic alien monster home from Earth to mate. And the two of them are forced to consider a quiet domestic future together.

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North Power‑Air is in trouble. Their aircraft are crashing at an alarming rate, and no one can figure out the cause. Desperate for an answer, they turn to Waldo, a crippled genius who lives in a zero‑g home in orbit around Earth. But Waldo has little reason to want to help the rest of humanity—until he learns that the solution to Earth’s problems also hold the key to his own.

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The fifth omnibus edition of the classic science fiction of A. Bertram Chandler’s John Grimes books and stories in this renowned SF space-faring saga. Contains Into the Alternate Universe, Contraband from Otherspace, The Rim Gods (1969)—a story collection, The Commodore at Sea (a.k.a. Alternate Orbits, 1971)—four novellas.

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Two legendary Andre Norton SF adventure novels in one omni volume.

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ABEL DASHIAN'S WORLD DOESN'T NEED A HERO
Duisberg is one of thousands of planets plunged into darkness and chaos by the collapse of the galactic republic, but where other worlds have begun to rebuild a star-travelling culture, Duisberg remains in an uneasy balance between mud-brick civilization and bloodthirsty barbarism.

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Tarawa. Iwo. Normandy.  Names that shine in the military history of two worlds, places where brave men stormed ashore and fought their way to victory no matter the odds.  But then there are other names: Marathon. Malta. Gallipoli.

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Agent Franks of the U.S. Monster Control Bureau is a man of many parts—parts from other people, that is. Franks is six foot five and all muscle. He’s nearly indestructible. Plus he’s animated by a powerful alchemical substance and inhabited by a super‑intelligent spirit more ancient than humanity itself.
Good thing he’s on our side. More or less.

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Kothifir the Great, ruled by an obscenely obese god‑king, peopled with colorful, dueling guilds, guarded by the Southern Host of the Kencyrath. Here Jame arrives, only to find that the turbulent city claims more of her attention as the Talisman than the Host’s training fields do as a second year randon cadet.

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April Contest

In one paragraph, tell us the best way aliens bent on human subjugation and conquest could hide among us and attempt to take over the world. Then, in a couple of sentences, suggest the best countermeasure. Wackiness counts, but clever is better. And, if you are convincing enough, we may all want to take due action based on your scenario!

Details here

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Check out the Baen Teacher's Guide to Treecat Wars, the latest in our popular series of teacher’s guides for Baen books that might be appropriate for high school or college classroom reading. These includes synopses, discussion questions, quizzes, and more. Our latest reader’s group guide is 1636: The Devil’s Opera Reader's Group Guide, useful for your book club, online reading group, and to enhance your own enjoyment of the book.

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Baen Teacher and Student Guide Catalog


The former colonists of the Freehold of Grainne are done with the occupation of their planet by the UN forces of Earth. In fact, the locals aren't content with lobbing missiles at the opposition. They intend to go that extra step. Andn now Jandro Hauer is about to find out that even a trip to the local bazaar for a quick bite can be an invitation to horror. A new story by Michael Z. Williamson set in the Freehold universe. Williamson's excellent new collection of short fiction and provocative nonfiction is available here.



Soft Casualty

by Michael Z. Williamson


Jandro Hauer waited in the hot, bright light of Iota Persei for his shuttle to clear for boarding. On his forearm was a medication patch feeding a steady dose of strong tranquilizer. Above that was an IV line from a bottle hanging off his collar. He'd be in orbit in a few hours, and transferred to a starship home. Perhaps then he could calm down.

"Hey, Soldier," someone called. There were eighty or so people at this boarding. He looked toward the voice to see another uniform. A US Marine with a powered prosthesis on his right leg gave a slight wave.

"Hey, Marine," he replied. "Soldier" wasn't strictly accurate for the combined South American Service Contingent, but it was close enough. "I noticed the meds,” the man said, pantomiming at his own arm. "Are you a casualty? If it's okay to ask."


Click here to continue reading the story...





Here's part two of our look at how rockets rendezvous and dock, written by former NASA Space Shuttle mission control specialist Terry Burlison. What does it really take to get a vehicle from the launch pad into orbit and mated safely with another craft, hundreds of miles high traveling at a blistering 18,000 miles per hour? Sit down, strap in, and hold on. You’re about to learn why it’s called “rocket science.”.


Rendezvous and Docking:
A User’s Guide for Non Rocket Scientists (Part 2)

by Terry Burlison


In last month’s article we discussed rendezvous: that magical blend of art and science that enables us to figure out when to launch our spacecraft and how to maneuver it to the proximity of another vehicle already in orbit above the Earth. We flew an imaginary space shuttle rendezvous, culminating in a stand-off position some 40 miles (74 km) behind the International Space Station (ISS). The courtship phase of our mission is complete; now it’s time to get these vehicles to mate.

To do so, you must forget everything you know about how things move on Earth.

Imagine you’re the starting quarterback in the Super Bowl. You take the first snap from center, spy a receiver breaking into the open downfield, and loft a perfect pass that drops gently into his hands as he streaks toward the end zone. You’re up six-nothing and already making plans for that MVP trophy.

Not a likely scenario, admittedly, but one that’s easy to imagine.

Now, let’s move that game into the future: the first Super Bowl played in low Earth orbit. Players line up, hovering in zero gravity with their NFL jetpacks. The center snaps the ball, you see the receiver open far ahead, and once more you loft the football in his direction. This time however, the ball continues to climb, moving higher and higher above the playing field. Worse, the ball also starts slowing down as it gains altitude. It stops moving forward entirely and, still climbing, begins gliding back toward the line of scrimmage! You stare in horror as the ball now flies backward, far over your head, picking up speed as it hurtles out of the stadium behind you! The game is only a few minutes in, you’re already down two-nothing, and the world is laughing at you. What went wrong?

Welcome to the Alice in Wonderland world of orbital mechanics.


Click here to continue reading the full article...






This concludes the multipart series on training for war by retired Army lieutenant colonel Tom Kratman, creator of the popular Carrera military science fiction series, with latest entry Come and Take Them. Kratman’s contention: an army is for winning wars. And to win wars, you have to train men (and some women) to be warriors, not police or social workers.



Training for War, Part Six

by Tom Kratman


Collective Training

There are a number of different approaches one can take to collective training. If I had to characterize the American technique, I would say we use the building block approach, heavy on repetition. By “building block approach” I mean we train on, say, assembly area procedures as an independent item, as we may train on conduct of a vehicular movement along a road as an independent item, and as we may train on bounding overwatch or react to near ambush or assault as independent items. To a considerable extent, drill is the mortar that holds those building blocks together.

I am unconvinced that this is the best way to do it. The reader may take that as meaning, “I am fully convinced that this is not the best way to do it.” In the first place, review those filters I gave for drills. Again, most things we train on as drills ought not be done as drills. This makes for a very weak mortar, heavy on the sand. Secondly, this approach really doesn’t grab the troops’ attention, their hearts and minds. “Boo hoo…so we missed X in the assembly area? So what?” Thirdly, this approach, being mostly performance measure oriented, tends to lack quality control. “Yes, you did Z. How well did you do it and how do you know? Oh, someone checked he blocks for performance measures, did they?”

Instead, I offer the following as a better alternative to the building block approach.


Click here to continue reading the full article...







The Baen Free Radio Hour offers a weekly dose of Baen news, contests, suggestions for developing writers and readers, and, above all, lively discussion with a galaxy of authors, artists, and scientists all around the Baen Books universe. Plus: great audio adaptations of Baen author works, and professional readings of the science fiction and fantasy you love.

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